середа, 30 березня 2016 р.

Uglies


Uglies
by Scott Westerfeld
Science fiction, Fantasy
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Uglies (Boxed Set): Uglies, Pretties, Specials (The Uglies)I liked this book, mostly because it happens in the future (I love books about the future). That's also why I said fantasy, not because there is time traveling or aliens. However, there are hover boards, and everybody gets one. The most interesting part was how it happened in the future and all of the little interesting details the author used to tell us that and things that they had, that we don't. They also referred to us as "rusties", because we used a lot of metal in our buildings. I think that it would be very interesting to live in the future, whether the future looked like this or something different (I'm betting on the hover boards, though). I would recommend this to anyone who likes reading about the future, and there is also some mystery and suspense in this book because Tally is uncovering the truth about her city. I like Tally and can relate to her because she likes sneaking out, solving problems and (usually) gets out of scrapes. I think the author those this title because the people in the cities are referred to as "uglies" before they turn sixteen and get the operation ( and turn to "pretties"). The cover is Tally peeking out behind a leaf. I think this might be either because she doesn't wan't to show her whole so-called ugly face, or because she's exploring and hiding. Contrast and Contradiction: "Go! Get your ugly face away from here!" (Tally's is acting differently, and rudely because she's mad at David and doesn't wan't to see him.)

The Fairest are quite Unfair

Fairest
by Gail Carson Levine
Science fiction, Fantasy
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Результат пошуку зображень за запитом "fairest"
I liked this book and how there was magic incorporated in a seemingly ordinary life (except for the gnomes and orges). I also liked how the main character, Aza, went from a simple inn setting to a castle and learned to carry herself grandly. It was interesting to see how her whole demeanor changed as she went from a simple innkeeper's daughter (and maid) to a lady-in-waiting to the new queen. It was also very interesting when Aza, the prince and the other royals played the game in which they where given a book, the skimmed the context and then had to sing a song. The more your audience laughed, the better you did. And, of course, how well you sang also counted. Playing that game would have been fun. Visiting the magical kingdom of Ayortha, where they hold "sings" for all important events and everyone has to write their own song and then sing it, would be rather interesting and fun, but I'm not sure if I would like to live there. Better one of their neighboring kingdoms, like Kioria, where they dance all the time. I recommend this book to people who like books with magic items and a little but of mystery. I think my friend Chloe would like it because she enjoys a lot of the same books I do. I like the character Aza, because she has a pretty voice and a magical ability to make it sound like her voice is coming out of different places, but I can only relate to her in the fact that she gets out of problems well. I think the author choose this title because in Ayortha it matters for pretty you are and how well you can sing and in this book, Aza wasn't very pretty, but she could sing well, and the queen couldn't sing well, nor was she that pretty (without her magic potion). I also think that it has a hidden meaning about who's heart was kinder, making them the fairest. The cover shows Aza hiding her face, like it ofetn says she does in the book. But if you read the book, you can see that she is using the magic mirror (so it makes you think, is that her after beauty potion state, or before beauty potion state?). Realization: " The queen only made her lady-in-waiting for her voice."